Celebrating Halloween With Less Consumerism

As with many other holidays, companies have managed to turn Halloween into a consumerist product. Emphasis is placed on the purchase and distribution of mass amounts of candy, overpriced cheaply made costumes, and non-environmentally friendly packaging.

When we celebrate Halloween by taking our children trick-or-treating, it’s easy to fall into this mindset. In an attempt to place emphasis on other aspects of the holiday, many parents attempt to de-emphasize the candy. While it may seem that by donating a candy stash or trading in candy for other items we are avoiding mass consumerism, that is untrue.

When we take our children trick-or-treating and then trade the candy or throw it away, we are not only supporting consumerism in a marketing sense, but we are also setting an example of consumerist living to our children. It shows them that it is acceptable to solicit items with no intent to use them. It can produce a “give me” attitude of entitlement. Throwing food in the trash, regardless of nutritional value, shows acceptability of wasting resources. Sending candy to charities can send the message that those who benefit from charity are only worthy of unwanted items. Accepting candy produced by companies with questionable ethics still supports those companies.

Our family trick-or-treats. Our children have complete control over their trick-or-treating. Not only do we not take away their candy or exert control over what they do with it, we also don’t limit how much they can collect. While other children are out from start to finish, gathering as much candy as they can, our children trick-or-treat for a little while, before telling us they are finished and asking us to drive them home.

Instead, our focus on Halloween is not consumerism — paying exhorbitant amounts for cheaply made costumes or collecting mass amounts of candy for trick-or-treating. Trick-or-treating on Halloween night is only one small way we celebrate. Here are others:

  • Each October, we head to a local old-fashioned pumpkin patch. While the local custom is to go to a pumpkin-themed attempt at an amusement park (consumerism once again), we go to a family-run pumpkin patch that has pumpkins and some bales of hay for kids to jump in. We make a day of it, buying reasonably priced pumpkins and supporting a family-run business. We buy some pumpkins for carving and stock up on pie pumpkins. Later in the month, we roast and puree the pie pumpkins, freezing some for later use and making various pumpkin recipes.
  • We decorate our home. We have a few items we pull out each year, but we make the rest, focusing on inexpensive handmade items, and giving a purpose to some of the many, many wonderful art projects created by our children. We pull many of our decorations from nature or nature-inspired crafts.
  • We make costumes. My children spend quite a bit of time contemplating what they want to dress up as. We work together to design and make their costumes.
  • We attend Halloween and fall-themed programs. Many of our local libraries have free programs, including music concerts, story times, craft activities, and more. Nature centers not only have fall programs but also jack-o’lantern lit walks, hayrides, and more. Any fees support the center and educational programs rather than executives in corporate America. Historical centers offer old-fashioned Halloween fun with requests of canned goods to support local charities.
  • We celebrate with friends with parties, pumpkin carving, homemade trunk-or-treats, and costume wearing get-togethers.
  • We read books, pulling out some of our favorites and checking out others from the library. We read and tell scary stories by candlelight while sipping hot cocoa or apple cider.
  • We prepare for winter and discuss the true meaning of Samhain.

And then, as a culmination of all of our Halloween celebrations, as opposed to a commercially focused one-day celebration, we take the kids trick-or-treating.

How do you celebrate Halloween or autumn?

This post was orginally published at Living Peacefully with Children.

About The Author: Mandy

My NPN Posts

Mandy O'Brien is an unschooling mom of five. She's an avid reader and self-proclaimed research fanatic. An active advocate of human rights, Mandy works to provide community programs through volunteer work. She is a co-author of the book Homemade Cleaners, where simple living and green cleaning meet science. She shares a glimpse into her life at Living Peacefully with Children, where she writes about various natural parenting subjects and is working to help parents identify with and normalize attachment parenting through Attachment Parents Get Real.

4 Responses to Celebrating Halloween With Less Consumerism

  1. Montessori Motherload

    What a thoughtful post. Many schools run the UNICEF “orange box” campaign and encourage kids to collect change while trick-or-treating. I have participated in “trick-or-EATing” events where we distributed flyers to homes a week before Halloween and collected non-perishable food items for our local food bank on Halloween night. I did this one year with my elementary class and their parents and it was a huge hit!

  2. Jen  

    What lovely ideas, I’m in the UK where Halloween has all of a sudden become extremely popular and commercial. (It wasn’t like that when I was young). And I love your ideas as a way to let kids still feel like they’re getting invloved and celebrating Halloween with out getting carried away with the commercial aspect. That way it can be a fun opportunity to spend quality family time together

  3. martine Bracke

    I really love this idea thanks

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